Infinity Turbine LLC

Organic Rankine Cycle

Waste Heat to Power ORC search was updated real-time via Filemaker on:

Waste Heat to Power ORC Contents List

Previous Page View | Next Page View

Search Completed.
Publication Name: PureCycle Product Development and Applications Update 2009
Original File Name Searched: Morgan__Byers_2009.pdf
Page Number: 001

PDF Text:

PureCycle® Product Development and Applications Update

Craig Morgan1, Stephen Byers2

1 Pacific Heat and Power, Level 14, 500 Collins Street, Melbourne VIC 3000

2 Pratt & Whitney Power Systems, 400 Main Street, East Hartford, Connecticut, USA * Corresponding Author: craig.morgan@pacificheatandpower.com, +61 3 9013 4425

Australian Geothermal Energy Conference 2009

When field trials were first conducted in 2006 the PureCycle® product introduced a new concept in modular, packaged, quick to market organic rankine cycle power generation systems. Over 2008 and 2009 the PureCycle® system was deployed in number of applications including waste heat capture, both small scale (500kW) and large scale (10MW) geothermal power plants. The systems have performed exceptionally well with over 98% availability and exceeded expectations. Nevertheless, system improvements continue to be made.

This paper summarises the overall performance of the systems currently in operation, product features and their performance in the field, and new technical innovations that are being offered and considered by Pratt & Whitney Power Systems.

Keywords: PureCycle®, Pratt & Whitney Power Systems, Pacific Heat and Power

PureCycle® applications to date

The first field trial for PureCycle® was conducted in 2006 in Chena Springs, Alaska. Since that time standard water-cooled systems using the non- flammable working fluid R245fa have been deployed in numerous applications:

! 10MW at Raser Technologies’ Utah plant, USA operating on geothermal brine (Fluid - geothermal brine from a hot sedimentary aquifer; Temperature – 121°C; Flow Rate: approx 19 l/s per unit). The system is water cooled using a common cooling tower.

! 2 units on a greenhouse operation in the USA operating on geothermal brine (Fluid - geothermal brine from a hot sedimentary aquifer; Temperature – 108°C; Flow Rate: approx 29 l/s per unit). The system is water- cooled using a common cooling tower.

! 1 unit on waste heat from diesel jacket water in Guatemala (Fluid – ethylene glycol; Temperature – 99°C; Flow Rate: approx 60 l/s per unit). The system is water cooled using a cooling tower.

! 1 unit at the Oregon Institute of technology for the first geothermal plant in Oregon (Fluid - geothermal brine from a hot sedimentary aquifer; Temperature – 88°C; Flow Rate: 21.5 l/s). The unit is water cooled using a cooling tower.

! 2 units on a waste to energy plant in Massachusetts (Fluid – one on low pressure steam and one on ethylene glycol; Temperature – 105C; Flow Rate: 4500 kg/hr (steam) & 65 kg/s)

! 1 unit using the thermal energy from an oil and gas well and operating on R134a (Fluid – co-produced fluids from an oil and gas well; Temperature – 85°C; Flow Rate: 54 l/s)

! The rate of enquiries and equipment orders is increasing. Based on the existing pipeline of opportunities we would expect this number to substantially increase with the continued strengthening of geothermal markets, and increasing focus on waste heat recovery and energy efficiency in industrial and oil and gas markets.

Performance summary

To date the equipment across all applications is operating at > 98% availability. Power output has been consistent with the theoretical models developed in the UTC Research Centre in East Hartford, Connecticut.

Technical innovations on the Model 280

The product development team continue to make system improvements that increase efficiency, broaden the variety of suitable applications, and provide the ability to operate in with zero water for cooling. Key additions to the product include:

! Air condenser for use in areas with limited access to water. The refrigerant is condensed directly in the air-condenser to maximise heat transfer.

! Recuperator that improves the cycle efficiency on the air and water cooled systems. This works by capturing the waste heat from the turbine exhaust and pre-heating the incoming hot liquid prior to the evaporator.

! Coatings and equipment modifications such as those necessary for a high H2S environment in some international geothermal fields.

! High pressure evaporators may also be selected on a case by case basis for some applications.

1

239

PDF Image:

 Supercritical Fluid Extraction PureCycle Product Development and Applications Update 2009 Page 001
Waste Heat to Power - ORC - - Waste Heat to Power System - Go to website

Search Engine Contact: greg@infinityturbine.com